Nonsurgical Alternatives to Relieve Back Pain
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Nonsurgical Alternatives to Relieve Back Pain

Twenty percent of people with back pain have spinal injuries, usually involving the rapture of one or more disks, the gel-filled shock absorbers between the vertebrae, or the bones of the spinal stack. Before preferring for a surgery, people with that type of injury should wait for at least 3months after being diagnosed by a doctor and use alternative remedies during that time, unless there is an emergency situation.

NONSURGICAL ALTERNATIVES TO RELIEVE BACK PAIN

Almost eighty percent of Americans have back pain – usually lower back pain – at some time in their lives and 45 percent of those folks will have repeated “back attacks,” says Jerome F. McAndrews, DC, a chiropractor in Claremore, Oklahoma, and a national spoke person for the American Chiropractic Association.

If you are currently experiencing back pain, and you’re thinking about having surgery to solve the problem, a surgeon who has performed thousands of spine surgeries says, “Think again.”

“If you can recover from back pain without surgery, you’re much better-off,” says Stephen Hochschuler, MD, an orthopedic surgeon in Plano, Texas. Surgery can have unforeseen complications, from infection to nerve damage. Surgery can fail, departing you with more pain than you had before and most important, surgery is usually not necessary, the good doctor explains.

Dr. Hochschuler further explains, that most people suffering with back pain have a problem with short, tight, rigid back muscles and it can be relieved by improved postures while sitting, standing and working; regular aerobic exercise; stretching; and exercises to strengthen the back muscles.

Twenty percent of people with back pain have spinal injuries, usually involving the rapture of one or more disks, the gel-filled shock absorbers between the vertebrae, or the bones of the spinal stack. Before preferring for a surgery, people with that type of injury should wait for at least 3months after being diagnosed by a doctor and use alternative remedies during that time, unless there is an emergency situation. Many times, disks get better with the same types of non-medical treatments that repair back muscles, Dr. Hochschuler stated.

Want to start relieving your pain today with alternative home remedies? Sit up and notice the way you sit.

One of the leading perpetuators in chronic, non-traumatic lower-back pain is sitting and leaning back. Leaning back flattens the lower or lumbar area of your back, depriving the lower back of its natural curve. The weight of our body then pulls down to the lower lumbar vertebrae in the spine, stressing the ligaments and disks. “After many years of sitting this way, you may develop lower back pain,” says Dr. Pamela Adams, DC, a chiropractor and yoga instructor in Larkspur, California.

Leaning back while sitting also puts your weight in the middle of your buttocks, right where your sciatic nerve passes into your legs. “If you sit this way for years, you may pinch your sciatic nerve, and you’ll start developing shooting pains down one or both legs.” Dr. Adams warns.

Practicing correct posture is an effective way to prevent and relieve muscular back pain and its easy to do in any situation.

SITTING: Uplift your breastbone

The proper position for sitting is “just a whit” in front of your “sit bones” or the ischium bones of the pelvis. Those are the big bones that you can feel pressing against the chair right where your thighs end and your buttocks begin. At least you can feel them when you’re sting correctly. Lean slightly forward from your hips, then keeping your pelvis in place, move your upper back slightly back. This means don’t slouch forward, don’t round or hunch your back and shoulders and keep your feet flat on the floor. “You should be conscious of the curve in the small of your back,” says Dr. Adams.

The key to this pain-relieving, pain-preventing sitting posture is to lift your breastbone as you sit. Imagine that a string is attached to the middle of your chest and is prodding your breastbone upward. Do you want to lengthen the space between your belly button and your breastbone? This ‘corrected’ posture will feel awkward for a few days, however, because improper sitting for so long can change the configuration and tone your muscles.

Do this breastbone-lifting exercise whenever you notice that you are leaning back or slumping over. The resulting posture not only will position your body correctly on your sit bones but it will also position your head correctly on top of your spine, putting your spine in a natural alignment that supports your musculature and gives the overworked muscles of your lower back some much-needed relief.

DRIVING: Your road back to health

“Many people who drive for a living have terrible back pain,” Dr. Adams stated. That is because car seats seem designed to hurt your back. Your knees are high than your hips, throwing the weight of your body onto your sciatic nerve. And you’re leaning back with your head forward while your arms extended, which stresses your lower back and neck too.

The strategy to minimize the damage is to move your car seat as flat as possible so that your knees and hips are level, “You want to drive the same way you sit,” says Dr. Adams.

If your car doesn’t adjust automatically, you can build up the dip in the seat by sitting on a folded towel, a foam wedge, or a small pillow. Put a small pillow behind your lower back as well.

Next, position the seat so that you aren’t reaching for the steering wheel or leaning forward to grasp it. The wheel should be close enough to your arms can hang naturally from your shoulders and your shoulders feel relaxed.

Just be sure that your breastbone is about 10 inches from the center of injury from your seatbelt or airbag if you’re in an accident.

Good postures and sleeping habits for back pain is next.

Primary Image Source: http://www.fitness-programs-for-life.com/images/SittingX3.jpg

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Comments (10)

well writen article,votes

So true about driving.  One time our car was in the shop they gave us a loaner mini van.  My back was in pain for days after driving that it was because of the seat position I am sure

Informative article! I just don't know if the nonsurgical solution will still work for me. I've been living with a scoliosis since my teens and the chronic back pain has not really stopped since. Have gotten used to the pain, anyway.

I usually experience backache and I don't know how to relieve it.  Thanks for the tips.

Another great post, dear Ron. Have a nice weekend, my friend!

As I read this I realize I am hunched over my computer.  How bad is that?

You can still straighten up your posture Rae, I think that's not too bad and you can do the exercises little by little unti you're comfortable.

I can relate! Good article.

What an important article, especially for writers who sit a lot. Thank-you

I found this post very useful related to nonsurgical-alternatives-to-relieve-back-pain.Thanks for sharing.Medicine supplier

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